Frank Warrens has nothing good to say about removing a lane on Northwest Everett Street for four blocks to create a bike lane. “A war on cars is a very appropriate term for what they’re doing,” he said. Photo by Vadim Makoyed

Frank Warrens has nothing good to say about removing a lane on Northwest Everett Street for four blocks to create a bike lane. “A war on cars is a very appropriate term for what they’re doing,” he said. Photo by Vadim Makoyed

Driving out cars

While almost all recognize the need to curb driving habits, many find alternative transportation programs hard to swallow.

Allan Classen

The folks who dream of a city with more bicyclists, pedestrians and transit riders are nevertheless loathe to speak of making driving less convenient.

“It sounds to me awfully negative to say we are ‘discouraging automobile use,’” said Phil Selinger, a retired transit planner active in the Northwest District Association. “I don’t think the NWDA, at least, has ever made such a statement.”

Art Pearce, manager of policy planning and projects for the Portland Bureau of Transportation, is similarly skittish on the topic.

“That sounds like we’re taking away something without acknowledging what we’re giving back,” said Pearce, who prefers to emphasize transportation alternatives.

Frank Warrens, on the other hand, does not mince words.


Warrens owns the auto repair shop bearing his name on Northwest 20th near Burnside.


The recent conversion of one vehicle lane into a bike lane along Northwest Everett Street between 19th and 23rd avenues blew his gasket.


“The brain-dead idiots who came up ▶

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Keeping it local

Neighborhood couple quietly opens medical marijuana dispensary behind art gallery on Thurman Street.

Allan Classen

Medical marijuana cardholders browse the dispensary, where they can choose from smoke-able, edible and liquid forms of the product. Oregon law requires that the dispensary have a locked door. Photo by Vadim Makoyed

Medical marijuana cardholders browse the dispensary, where they can choose from smoke-able, edible and liquid forms of the product. Oregon law requires that the dispensary have a locked door. Photo by Vadim Makoyed

Next month, a state initiative will decide whether recreational use of marijuana will become legal. Like many voters, Bobby Wald isn’t sure how he feels about Ballot Measure 91.


While he harbors no phobias about the plant and its derivatives, he can imagine negative consequences when large numbers of people will suddenly have access to a previously illegal substance.


Wald’s perspective is of special interest in that he quietly opened a marijuana dispensary behind an art gallery at 2384 NW Thurman St. Sept. 19. ▶

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NW Examiner October 2014 issue out now!
Read this month’s issue
INSIDE:

Driving out cars. Local marijuana store. City Council weighs MAC garage issue. No umbrellas. Proposed hotel gets warm welcome after revisions. Those Pesky boys of Slabtown.
And More

Why won’t this thing retract?

Why won’t this thing retract?

No umbrellas

Allan Classen

Under cloudy skies some years ago, I attended a concert at Waterfront Park. Many in the crowd brought umbrellas, which popped out when the rains came. The problem with this instinctive gesture was that the extended umbrellas blocked everyone’s view of the stage.  No one could see, and those without umbrellas were still getting wet.

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