Rama, a 31-year-old Asian elephant was euthanized at the Oregon Zoo last month due to pain and immobility resulting from a 25-year-old leg injury. Photo: Michael Durham, courtesy Oregon Zoo

Rama, a 31-year-old Asian elephant was euthanized at the Oregon Zoo last month due to pain and immobility resulting from a 25-year-old leg injury. Photo: Michael Durham, courtesy Oregon Zoo

Zoo wants out of ivory-selling ban

Zoo officials say proposed legislation may interfere with efforts to unload its stockpile of tusks.

Allan Classen

The Oregon Zoo testified last month in support of state legislation to ban the sale of ivory.

The zoo’s deputy conservation manager had the perfect sound bite:

“Humans can survive without ivory," said David Shepherdson. "Elephants can’t."

Behind the scenes, however, Shepherdson and other zoo officials are seeking an exemption from the measure, known as Senate Bill 913. It may not be a matter of the institution’s survival, but for somewhat hazy reasons,

it is not ready to forgo the benefits of its ivory stockpile.

Minutes of a Metro Council work session in March state that because the Oregon Zoo “has an ivory collection and produces ivory naturally because of its elephant collection, it is asking for an exemption … in order to dispel potential liabilities.”

While Grant Spickelmier, education curator for the Oregon Zoo, insisted that “we have no intention of selling ivory,” no one at the work session got clarification of what it means to “dispel potential liabilities.”

Nevertheless, every councilor supported the amendment except Sam Chase, whose district includes Northwest Portland.

Continue reading

High expectations meet Stadium Fred Meyer remodel

Community sees the store as catalyst for array of livability goals

Allan Classen

The surrounding neighborhoods had a big say in the design of the new Stadium Fred Meyer. Working with company officials and architects since 2012, they sought to create a block that would enhance the neighborhood while taming some of its chronic problems.

The Northwest District Association and Goose Hollow Foothills League—in conjunction with city of Portland planners—saw the store as a linchpin in taming busy West Burnside Street, transforming it into a pedestrian-friendly part of the neighborhood rather than just a daunting vehicle thoroughfare. By widening sidewalks, adding pedestrian amenities and creating public gathering places, it was hoped that nearby shops and restaurants could thrive where once residents feared to tread.

Continue reading

nw-examiner-may-2015
Read this month’s issue
INSIDE:

Food Front seats new board member / Besaw’s losing lease / Fred Meyer remodel / Zoom Room


And More